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Ettrick

Jacques Perconte/France/2015/00:40:00/World premiere

Jacques Perconte will be present for a Q&A at the screening

A special world premiere to be screened at Johnstons of Elgin woollen mill. Made over the course of several visits to the Scottish Borders by the French artist filmmaker Jacques Perconte, the film interrogates our unique heritage: sheep farming, fabrics, the woollen mill tradition and our unique landscapes are all rendered in an impressionistic arc of colour and movement .

The path we drive leads to the heart of the Ettrick Forest, a dive into a textile world. A land where man, machinery and nature deal with a complex relationship that draws their future. Slipping through poetry, between the brutality of matter and the sublime landscape, we experience a penetrating vision that embodies the stability of our deep desire to live in peace. Spectators are aware of the impotence of our movements, and we know that nature will find its way.

Biography/Filmography:

Jacques Perconte:
Born in 1974 in Grenoble (France), Jacques Perconte lives and works in Paris. Since the mid-90s he has built an artistic practice related to digital tools. Since the end of the 90’s, in films, video installations, and live performances, Jacques Perconte has invented a unique pictorial digital language through which he questions space, colour, landscape and society. In 2013 Côté Court Festival dedicated a panorama section to his work with a 23 film program. The very exclusive and secret Parisian club by David Lynch, the Silencio offered 4 programs of ten films in April 2014, including a special talk with Nicole Brenez. After offering two Cartes Blanches in 2011, the Cinematheque Française focused on his work with a retrospective in their avant-garde cycle, from December 2014 to February 2015. He has collaborated with Leos Carax, Jean-Benoît Dunckel, Jeff Mills, Hélène Breschand, Julie Rousse, Michel Herreria, Didier Arnaudet, Marc Em, Hugo Verlinde, Jean-Jacques Birge, Vincent Segal, Antonin-Tri Huang and Eddie Ladoire.

www.jacquesperconte.com
timeline.technart.fr
Jacques Perconte on Vimeo
At Lightcone
On Wikipedia
Collectif Jeune Cinema

This screening is supported by Johnstons Cashmere:
www.johnstonscashmere.com

Venue: Johnstons of Elgin, Eastfield Mills, Mansfield Road, Hawick
Tickets: £4
Screening date: Thurs 16 April
Screening time:

9.00 pm


Paul Sharits: A documentary feature film

François Miron /Canada/2015/01:25:00/United Kingdom premiere

François Miron will be present for a Q&A at the screening.

Long after his premature death, the impact of Paul Sharits lingers on. The prominent iconoclast and innovator provoked with fast-flickering, pulsating, colourful mosaics. The many interviews and testimonies are also a portrait of a generation of leading voices in experimental filmmaking. In the mid sixties Paul Sharits (1943-1993) started to explore the potential of the flicker. In the decades that followed, Sharits was strikingly persistent in pursuing the total deconstruction of the parameters of 16mm film into such novel forms as multiple projection installations, frozen film frames caught in-between plexiglass sheets, and ink coloured partitions for abstract films. The ultimate impact of the work was not theoretical, but on the contrary very physical, even visceral. Miron’s documentary not only offers a great recapitulation of one of the most idiosyncratic and pertinent oeuvres within avant-garde film history. He also sketches the portrait of a tormented, deeply romantic artist, always courting disaster but also cursed by an inherited mental condition. The reconstruction of a tragic career is animated with ample illustrations combined with home movies and other rarely seen archive materials.

This screening will be accompanied by a special showing of one of Paul Sharits’ seminal works on 16mm film: T.O.U.C.H.I.N.G (USA, 1968, 12m).

Biography/Filmography:

François Miron began makings films in 1982, working exclusively with emulsion (as in the light-sensitive coating of film, NOT video). The body of his early work consists of several short experimental films, all created using a powerful film image manipulation technique that he has mastered: optical printing. In 1990 he received an MFA in filmmaking from The School of The Art Institute Of Chicago where he went under a full merit scholarship, all of his films have been screened in festivals and all sorts of venues throughout the world, his work receiving numerous awards and true underground acclaim. The Evil Surprise 1994 Best Experimental Film Award, Ann Arbor. What Ignites Me 1991 Best Experimental Film Award, Illinois Film & Video Festival Chicago. Square Root Of Negative 3 1991 Special Award, Humboldt Film Festival, California. Since 1993 he has been teaching optical printing, cinematography, filmmaking, and technical aspects of films at the Mel Hoppenheim School Of Cinema in Montreal. See this link for more.

http://www.paulsharitsdoc.com/

Venue: Main Auditorium, Tower Mill, Heart of Hawick
Tickets: £4
Screening date: Fri 17 April
Screening time:

2.30pm


Light Matters: #11, Marey Moiré & #37

Joost Rekveld/Netherlands/1999 & 2009/01:10:00/Scottish Premiere

Joost Rekveld will be present for a Q&A at the screening.

Dedicated to the film-work of Joost Rekveld, we will be screening newly digitised versions of two of his most famous 35mm films, #11, Marey <–> Moiré (21m) and #37 (31m). Through his unique practice of luminous poiesis, Joost Rekveld creates films filled with structured light abstractions, at times invoking an almost transcendental experience in the viewer. Yet his work is substantively concerned with the material and sensual properties of light: its symmetries, crystalline forms, diffractions and diffusions. These possibilities emerge out of a controlled interaction between light, man and machine, a dialogue at the heart of his practice. Using computer controlled optical-mechanical devices for the distribution and perversion of light across the filmstrip, or custom coded computer simulations of crystal diffraction patterns, his work often refers to the deep technological history of film and media practice.

Biography/Filmography:

Joost Rekveld’s abstract films have been shown world-wide in a wide range of festivals and venues for experimental film, animation or other kinds of moving image. Most of his recent films had their premieres at the International Film Festival Rotterdam and he had retrospectives at the Barbican in London and the Ann Arbor Film Festival amongst others. Individual films have been screened at hundreds of venues, including the ICA and the Tate Modern in London, The Centre Pompidou in Paris and the Moderna Museet in Stockholm. His film #11, Marey <–> Moire was the first Dutch film to be ever shown at the Sundance Film Festival.

He has realised several installations and was involved in many collaborative projects involving composers, music ensembles, theatre companies, dance companies and artist’s labs. These included dance company Emio Greco | PC (Amsterdam / Marseille), music theatre ensemble De Veenfabriek (Leiden), contemporary music ensembles such as ASKO / Schonberg (Amsterdam) and ensemble Intercontemporain (Paris), Opera North (Leeds) and The Royal Opera (London) and electronic art and music laboratories such as IRCAM (Paris), STEIM (Amsterdam) and the V2 Institute for Unstable Media (Rotterdam).

http://www.joostrekveld.net/

Venue: Main Auditorium, Tower Mill, Heart of Hawick
Tickets: £4
Screening date:
Screening time:

7.30pm


Magic Mirror

Sara Pucill/United Kingdom/2013/01:15:00/

Sarah Pucill will be present for a Q&A at the screening.

Magic Mirror combines a re-staging of the French Surrealist artist Claude Cahun’s black and white photographs with selected extracts from her book Aveux Non Avenus (Confessions Denied). In Surrealist kaleidoscopic fashion the film creates a weave between image and word, exploring the links between Cahun’s photographs and writing as well as between those of the films of Sarah Pucill, as both artists share similar iconography and concerns.

Cahun’s multi-subjectivity as expressed in both her book and photographs, set the scene for the film, where she dresses and makes her face up in so many different ways, swapping identities between gender, age and the inanimate. Three women masquerade as Cahun’s characters: often it is hard to tell them apart. The splitting of identity appears as a double which persists throughout; as a literal double (through super-imposition), as shadow, imprints in sand, reflections in water, mirror or distorting glass. Likewise the voice is split between differently dressed voices, which sometimes speak at the same time and sometimes in dialogue. Part essay, part film poem, Magic Mirror translates the startling force of Cahun’s poetic language into a choreographed series of Vivantes Tableaux, intermixed with stagings from her writing.

(Selected text from Aveux Non Avenus (Confessions Denied), Claude Cahun, 1928. Translated by Rachel Gomme)

Biography/Filmography:

Sarah Pucill’s films and photographs explore a sense of self, which is transformative and fluid. At the core of her practice is a concern with mortality and the materiality of the filmmaking process. The majority of her films take place within the confinements of domestic space, where the grounded reality of the house itself becomes a portal to a complex and multi layered psychical realm. In her explorations of the animate and inanimate, her work probes a journey between mirror and surface, in which questions of representation are negotiated via the feminine, the queer or the dead.

Her films have been screened at major international film festivals including: London Film Festival, Oberhausen Short Film Festival, Ann Arbor Film Festival, Osnabruck Media Arts Festival, Berlin International Film Festival and Montreal Festival of New Cinema. Television broadcasts include: BSB TV Australia (Mirrored Measure, 1996; bought by BSB), Carlton Television (Backcomb, 95; funded by Carlton), Granada TV (You Be Mother, 1990).

Sarah Pucill lives and works in London and is a Reader at The University of Westminster since 2000. Her work is distributed through leading international distributors including LUX, The British Film Institute (BFI), New York Filmmakers Co-op, Canyon Cinema, and Light Cone Paris.

http://www.sarahpucill.co.uk/

Venue: Main Auditorium, Tower Mill, Heart of Hawick
Tickets: £4
Screening date: Sat 18 April
Screening time:

4.30pm


Field of Dogs

Lech Majewski/Poland/2014/01:36:00/Scottish Premiere

Lech Majewski will be present for a Q&A at the screening.

Lech Majewski’s remarkable Field of Dogs is a sumptuously shot filmic exploration of loss and spiritual redemption. The film shimmers in a richly imagistic yet uncertain territory between imagination and reality. It is set in recent history, in 2010, when the Polish people lost their president Lech Kaczynski, along with many others, in a plane crash. This context of national tragedy is mirrored in the personal tragedy of loss being experienced by a former professor, who enters into a dark and hallucinatory journey, ultimately toward a rediscovery of light and meaning. Stunningly rendered visual set-pieces punctuate the film, at times referencing the great paintings upon which Majewski so often draws. His father ploughs up the floor of a supermarket with oxen, people in evening dress stand still in a lit wood at night, in a liminal vision of purgatory, great sheets of water flood through a cathedral. Majewski is not afraid to tackle the big themes of life and death with bold visual ambition and deep commitment, bringing to film not only his own sense of humanity, but also a very personal rendering of the spirituality of the Polish psyche.

Biography/Filmography:

Artist, filmmaker, poet, and stage director; born in Katowice, Poland; graduated from the Łódź Film School in 1977.

In 2011, Lech Majewski completed three years of work on The Mill & The Cross, a film based on Peter Bruegel’s painting “The Way to Calvary”. This unique digital tapestry, composed of layer upon layer of perspective, atmospheric phenomena and people, required patience and imagination as well as the use of new CG technology and 3D effects. Starring Charlotte Rampling, Michael York and Rutger Hauer as Bruegel, the film opened at Sundance Film Festival and was praised by Dennis Harvey in Variety as “an extraordinary imaginative leap; visually ravishing, surprisingly beguiling gamble; immersive experience… remarkable.” and by David D’Arcy in Screen International as “a breakthrough epic film… a revelation that should not be missed.” Since then the film sold to over 50 countries and has taken part in a score of festivals. Based on this intricate film work, Majewski created a series of videoart pieces entitled Bruegel Suite, that were installed in February 2011 in the Louvre and in June became a part of the 54th Venice Biennale, displayed in Titian’s parish, Chiesa San Lio.

While working on The Mill & The Cross, Majewski has had retrospectives of his works in New Zealand, where he lectured in 2009 at the University of Canterbury on “The Hidden Language of Symbols in Art”. In the same period various presentations of his Art took place in Image Forum, Tokyo; National Gallery Zachęta, Warsaw; SmART Project Space, Amsterdam; The SPOT Taipei House, Taiwan; National Museum, Kraków and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Field of Dogs Website

http://lechmajewski.com/

Venue: Main Auditorium, Tower Mill, Heart of Hawick
Tickets: £4
Screening date: Sat 18 April
Screening time:

7.30pm